Business as Usual = Catastrophic Food Shortages

A scientific model developed by the Anglia Ruskin University indicates that without substantial change in behavior and (climate) policy, the world will suffer drastic food shortages and face food riots by 2040. What’s not mentioned in this article from The Independent is that global food supply issues, climate change, as well as other related issues such as deforestation, land degradation, water scarcity, poverty, and famine, are related to unsustainable industrialized animal agriculture, which accounts for as much as 51% of global greenhouse gas emissions. As my recent Meaty Infographics post showed, cutting down on meat and dairy is the single most important action we can take in our daily lives to make a difference for climate change and our own health and future well being.

Thankfully, a recent article from scientist Arthur Biglan supports what I’ve been saying all along and what my company specializes in: behavioral science is crucial to human well being. We humans ARE the solution to our health and the planet’s. According to Biglan (and confirmed by research I’m familiar with at Stanford University and elsewhere), behavioral science has had success in obesity prevention, sanitation, and other well being-related issues.

It’s time to apply behavioral science to address the intersecting problems of human wellness and climate change. The good news is: we’re already doing it! Research-based behavioral energy efficiency programs are going mainstream, and behavior change can help double world food supply.

We’ve got this. We just need to act, because our every action matters. For some tips on what you can do, check out this post I wrote to start off the new year: 2015: The Rise of Common Sense. 

Each and every person, and their every daily action counts in making a difference for the planet. Your diet, transportation, and how you use energy at home can all make a difference. Start somewhere, and keep going!

Each and every person, and their every daily action counts in making a difference for the planet. Your diet, transportation, and how you use energy at home can all make a difference. Start somewhere, and keep going! If everyone acts, we can steer away from catastrophic climate change and food losses to more adaptive and resilient ways of living.

 

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